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Chiesa di San Giovanni Evangelista

Chiesa di San Giovanni Evangelista

Reggio Emilia, IT

The church of San Giovanni Evangelista is first mentioned in the 12th century, but practically nothing has been preserved of the original structure. It was rebuilt in 1545 and, in the following century, it was frescoed by artists who later participated in the construction of the Basilica della Ghiara. In 1808 it was confiscated by the Napoleonic government and sold at auction to the merchant Luigi Trivelli, owner of the palace opposite the church. His son Giacomo used the church as a tannery and the side chapels as workshops. In 1896 the heir, Count Ferrante Palazzi Trivelli, gave the church for perpetual use to the Venerable Confraternity of the Immaculate Conception and St. Francis of Assisi.

Chiesa di San Giovanni in Bragora

Chiesa di San Giovanni in Bragora

Venezia, IT

The church of San Giovanni in Bragora dates from 829. Legend has it that St. Magnus, bishop of Oderzo, fled his native Opitergium because of the Lombard invasion (639) and that God himself ordered him in a dream to build eight churches, including the church of San Giovanni. However, the first real written record of a church in this area dates back to 1090. In 1464, the church was restructured in the late Gothic style in the form we know today. The work lasted thirty years, from 1475 to 1505, at the end of which it was rededicated, as it is written on the façade, on the architrave of the entrance door, under the lunette.

Chiesa di San Giovanni in Jerusalem

Chiesa di San Giovanni in Jerusalem

Poggibonsi, IT

The church of San Giovanni in Jerusalem dates back to the 12th century. In 1758, the interior of the church was restored at the expense of Lorenzo Corsini. The church was deconsecrated from 1822 to 1982. Today, the complex is the seat of the Militia Templi, a lay order of monastic and chivalric tradition, recognised by the State and the Catholic Church.

Chiesa di San Giovanni in Monte

Chiesa di San Giovanni in Monte

Bologna, IT

The church of San Giovanni in Monte was first mentioned in 1045, but it was enlarged in Romanesque style as early as 1286, and again modified in the 15th century. The bell tower dates from the 13th century, while the octagonal lantern dates from 1496 and is the work of Domenico Balatino. The façade, dating from 1474, was designed by Domenico Berardi and restored in 1914.

Chiesa di San Girolamo dei Croati

Chiesa di San Girolamo dei Croati

Roma, IT

The church of San Girolamo dei Croati a Ripetta, built in 1588-89, is the national church of the Croats in Rome. A community of refugees fleeing the Turks from Illyria and Slavonia had settled in the area overlooking the port of Ripetta since the 14th century. In 1453, Pope Nicholas V granted them the establishment of the Congregation of Saint Jerome of the Slavs. In the following century, Pope Sixtus V, who already owned the church, had it completely rebuilt by Martino Longhi the Elder between 1588 and 1589, adding a bell tower and rich furnishings.

Chiesa di San Giuseppe di Castello

Chiesa di San Giuseppe di Castello

Venezia, IT

The church of San Giuseppe di Castello was built in the 16th century with an adjoining Augustinian convent. The exterior of the building is in classical style, with lateral pilasters supporting a modest tympanum. The ceiling, frescoed in 1660-1663 by Pietro Ricchi, known as "the Lucchese", depicts, in the central tondo, St. Joseph in glory and, on the sides, the Glory of Saint Monica.

Chiesa di San Gregorio al Celio

Chiesa di San Gregorio al Celio

Roma, IT

The foundations of the present church of San Gregorio al Celio were laid in the 8th century. In 1633, Cardinal Scipione Borghese had the façade rebuilt in the style of the Church of St. Louis of the French and the portico by Giovanni Battista Soria. In 1725 the interior was restored by Giuseppe Serratini and Francesco Ferrari, and in 1830 by Cardinal Giacinto Placido Zurla.

Chiesa di San Gregorio della Divina Pietà

Chiesa di San Gregorio della Divina Pietà

Roma, IT

San Gregorio della Divina Pietà is a small church first mentioned in 1403. In 1729 the church was restored according to the plans of Filippo Barigioni, commissioned by Pope Benedict XIII Orsini di Gravina and entrusted to the Congregation of the Workers of the Divine Piety, hence its name. In 1858 the church was restored and a bilingual Hebrew and Latin inscription with a passage from the Bible was placed on the façade. The church is famous for the compulsory sermons that were imposed on Jews during the papal reign.

Chiesa di San Gregorio

Chiesa di San Gregorio

Venezia, IT

The ancient church of San Gregorio was probably erected at the beginning of the 9th century, and in 989 it was submitted to the Benedictines of the Abbey of Sant'Ilario. Due to the decline of the latter, the monks gradually moved to San Gregorio in the following years. It was originally affiliated to the church of Santa Maria Zobenigo and also served as a parish. The monastery was abolished in 1775. The church briefly retained its role as a parish church but was closed to worship in 1808 under Napoleon. While the monastery buildings were used as dwellings, the church was occupied by a mint for refining gold. After its restoration in 1959-60, it was used as a restoration workshop by the Soprintendenza per i beni artistici e storici di Venezia. Today, it has long been disused.

Chiesa di San Jacopo al Tempio

Chiesa di San Jacopo al Tempio

S. Giminiano, IT

The church of San Jacopo al Tempio is a Romanesque church that already existed in the early 13th century. In 1250, the church, which was initially outside the city walls, was included in the second circle of the city walls, at the San Jacopo gate. The church then belonged to the Hospitallers (1311), then was given to the hospital of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Pisa (1576), before belonging again to the Hospitallers of San Gimignano (1599). The present church owes much to a renovation begun in 1942.

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What is Religiana?

Religiana, a project by Future for Religious Heritage, presents a catalogue of beatiful and inspiring buildings, helping you experience Europe's history, today!