Explore Religious Heritage Across Europe

Here you can search for a building to visit. You can use the map find destinations, or you can use the filters to search for a building based upon what different criteria.

Refine search

Church of Notre-Dame d'Espérance

Church of Notre-Dame d'Espérance

Charlevile-Mézières, FR

Begun in 1499, construction took 120 years, reusing the foundations and some elements of the original Romanesque church. It is a late late flamboyant Gothic style of a large unit, with five naves and no external buttresses. The narrowness of the central nave and the absence of capitals accentuates the impression of height (18 m). Observe the exceptional vaults with twenty-one cross keystones, with large, richly decorated pendentives. Great diversity of carved decorations in the tops of the Gothic windows. Renaissance style for the staircase of the tribune and the exterior of the large west portal. The neo-Gothic south portal (restored in 2009) and the spire were added in the 19th century. The sober and uncluttered interior was restored after the 1944 bombing.

Church of Saint-Vorles

Church of Saint-Vorles

Châtillon-sur-Seine, FR

Because of its location above a high plateau, the church literally dominates the city. Here stood the important fortified castle of the Dukes of Burgundy and the bishops of Langres, of which only a few sections of the walls remain. A church preserving the relics of Saint-Vorles existed there since the 9th century. The collegiate church built at the beginning of the 11th century by the bishop of Langres is one of the oldest Romanesque buildings in Burgundy. The Lombard bands that decorate the exterior of the church are characteristic of the so-called Lombard art, found in the contemporary churches of Saint-Philibert de Tournus and Saint-Bénigne de Dijon, but which is rare in this northern part of Burgundy. A rather Ottonian or Carolingian influence can be noticed in the westbau of the church, which is a real two-storey western transept crowned by a bell tower, reminiscent of the great Rhine churches.

Ikast Church

Ikast Church

Ikast, DK

The Ikast Church dates back to 1907 and was built on the remains of an old medieval church that was destroyed in a fire on December 4, 1904. After restorations in the 1960s, the church was re-inaugurated on May 26, 1968.

Tenala Church

Tenala Church

Raseborg, FI

The church of Tenala is a stone church built between 1460 and 1480. The building was completely restored in 1984-1986. The furniture includes a wooden sculpture of St. Olaf from the 14th century, a mechanical organ from 1887 and the pulpit from 1655. The old pulpit support, in the form of a giant, is preserved in the church.

Doarps Church

Doarps Church

Rottevalle, NL

The church of Rottevalle is particularly striking because of the large amount of light that enters the church. This gives the interior of the church a very pleasant atmosphere. The church is available for worship services, weddings and funerals.

Synagogue in Harderwijk

Synagogue in Harderwijk

Harderwijk, NL

The Synagogue in Harderwijk is an Ashkenazi synagogue built in 1839-1840. Sold in the 1940s, this brick building now serves as a cultural centre.

Church of Saint-Pierre-et-Saint-Paul

Church of Saint-Pierre-et-Saint-Paul

Chânes, FR

The church of Saint Pierre and Saint Paul de Chânes was built in the 11th century by the monks of the nearby Cluny Abbey, on the site of a 9th century church. Its Romanesque nave is extended by an apse on the dome from which one can admire a fresco of Byzantine style. The gabled facade is decorated with semicircular Lombard arches highlighted by a "sawtooth" band. The bell tower is of the Cluniac type.

Oscar Fredrik Church

Oscar Fredrik Church

Göteborg, SE

Oscar Fredriks Church was built in the 1890s in the neo-Gothic style. The church has since been rebuilt three times: in 1915, 1940 and 1974. The interior is uniform in lush greenish colours.

Gothenburg Cathedral

Gothenburg Cathedral

Göteborg, SE

Gothenburg Cathedral, also known as Gustavi Cathedral, was consecrated in 1633. It is named after King Gustav II Adolf of Sweden who founded the city in 1621. Several fires burned down the two previous buildings. The third building is the present building. It was designed by the architect Carl Willhelm Carlberg. The cathedral was consecrated on 21 May 1815. The construction work was completed in 1827.

Namur Cathedral

Namur Cathedral

Namur, BE

Namur Cathedral was built between 1751 and 1767 and is named after Alban of Mainz. The construction of the cathedral therefore began 2 centuries after the creation of the diocese of Namur by Pope Paul IV in 1559. The cathedral is a combination of Baroque, Rococo and classical architecture, as are many buildings from the mid-18th century. The Italian-Swiss architect Pisoni built another cathedral in the same style in Solothurn in 1763.

Be inspired

What is Religiana?

Religiana, a project by Future for Religious Heritage, presents a catalogue of beatiful and inspiring buildings, helping you experience Europe's history, today!