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Church of Saint-Martin, Cuncy-les-Varzy

Church of Saint-Martin, Cuncy-les-Varzy

Cuncy-les-Varzy, FR

Located in Cuncy-les-Varzy (Burgundy-Franche-Comté), the parish Church of Saint Martin dates from the early sixteenth century. The building, which is of flamboyant Gothic style, has been listed as a Historic Monument since 1971. Its stained glass windows and several items of furniture, such as a Christ on the cross and a painting representing the Montée au Calvaire, are also listed.

Onze Lieve Vrouwe Kerk

Onze Lieve Vrouwe Kerk

Breda, NL

The OLV Church is the most important monument in Breda. It was built between 1410 and 1468.

Grande Chartreuse Monastery

Grande Chartreuse Monastery

Saint-Pierre-de-Chartreuse, FR

The Grande Chartreuse Monastery is the first monastery as well as the mother house of the hermit monks of the Carthusian order. The legend of the foundation of the monastery tells that a group of several monks, guided by Bishop Hugues de Grenoble (1080 to 1132), settled in June 1084 in the Chartreuse valley. Since the 19th century, the Grande-Chartreuse community has been known to oversee the production of the popular Chartreuse liqueur.

Synagogue in Buren

Synagogue in Buren

Buren, NL

The synagogue was situated inside an existing private residence in the year 1804. The façade of the modest and rather inconspicuous building features large pointed arched windows which were added during a renovation in 1864. The synagogue continued to be used until 1890 and was subsequently sold in 1901. The Jewish community of Buren merged with Tiel in circa 1906. The building was renovated in 1968 and currently functions as a meeting and exhibition space.

Great Synagogue in Deventer

Great Synagogue in Deventer

Deventer, NL

The synagogue was designed by the architect J. A. Mulock Houwer in a distinct Oriental architectural style. The function of the building can be identified as such by the Stone Tablets, located at the very top of the façade. The Moorish architectural features include the octagonal pinnacles and onion-shaped domes which evoke the architectural style of minarets. The close relationship with minarets was strengthened by the fact that the these pinnacles were originally topped with moon sickles while the central pinnacle was adorned with the Star of David. Another typical feature includes the horseshoe-shaped window arches, supported by small columns. The interior of the synagogue was destroyed and looted during the Second World War. The synagogue used to contain stained glass windows depicting the Twelve Tribes of Israel but these are no longer present. The Jewish services resumed between 1947 and 1952 after which the community held their services in the synagogue located along the Lange Bisschopstraat. The original synagogue was repurposed as a reformed church. The Torah niche has since been used as the location for the pulpit and organ. In the beginning of 2018, the Christian reformed community sold the building to Ayhan Sahin who wanted to redevelop the former synagogue into a food hall. This caused the Jewish community of Beth Shoshanna to start their own crowdfunding campaign with the idea of repurposing it as a cultural community center in order to respect the former religious function of the building.

Seckau Abbey

Seckau Abbey

Seckau, AT

Seckau Abbey is a Benedictine abbey which was founded in 1140 by Adalram von Waldeck. It became a bishop's abbey in 1218 and its church became a cathedral. In 1782, during the reign of Joseph II, the abbey was dismantled. The abbey was purchased by the congregation of Beuron in 1883 after the German Benedictines of Beuron Abbey were forced into exile due to the Kulturkampf policy. It was erected as an abbey in 1887 and became famous for its liturgical research. The National Socialist authorities confiscated it in 1940 and transformed it into a national institution of political education (Nationalpolitische Erziehungsanstalten, Napola or NPEA). The monks returned at the end of 1945.

Acqui Terme Cathedral

Acqui Terme Cathedral

Acqui Terme, IT

The cathedral of Acqui Terme was begun by Bishop Primo in the 11th century and consecrated on 11th November 1067 by Bishop Guido, who is venerated as the patron saint of the city and the diocese. It was built by Lombards in the form of a Romanesque building with a Latin cross plan and a projecting transept. Originally with three naves, the church was added two in the 18th century, with side chapels.

Duomo di Rovigo

Duomo di Rovigo

Rovigo, IT

The cathedral of Rovigo was built from 1696 to 1791 on top of an old church from the 11th century. In 1711, the demolition of the old cathedral was completed and in 1729, only the dome and the façade were missing. The dome was not completed until 1791 by Giacomo Quaglia da Tresto. The facade was to be built much further forward than the previous one, so that the new building would be located close to the baptistery, which made the traffic between the Porta Arquà and the square uncomfortable. The demolition of the baptistery, already planned, was completed in 1737. However, a solution for the façade was never found. In fact, the only interventions on the façade were limited to the portal, built in 1833.

Chiesa dei Santi Francesco e Giustina

Chiesa dei Santi Francesco e Giustina

Rovigo, IT

The church of Santi Francesco e Giustina was built between the end of the 13th and the beginning of the 14th century to meet the religious needs of the adjacent Franciscan monastery, which has now disappeared. The original building, of Gothic design, underwent important renovations which, after having been considerably enlarged, also changed the position of the facade, now in neoclassical style, which characterises its current appearance. The first body of the Church of St. Francis was built between 1297 and 1300 in the Gothic style, with a single nave, five apsidal chapels and a facade overlooking the present-day Via Silvestri. In 1413, the church was enlarged with a nave on the right side with five communicating chapels. The bell tower was built in 1520 and the central apse was further extended in 1533.

Klagenfurt Cathedral

Klagenfurt Cathedral

Klagenfurt, AT

Klagenfurt Cathedral was built in 1581 as a Protestant prayer house, making it the largest Protestant church built in Austria. Closed in 1600 during the Counter-Reformation, it was handed over four years later to the Jesuits who occupied it until the dissolution of the order in 1773. In 1787, the church was elevated to the rank of a cathedral.

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What is Religiana?

Religiana, a project by Future for Religious Heritage, presents a catalogue of beatiful and inspiring buildings, helping you experience Europe's history, today!