Explore Religious Heritage Across Europe

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Os Church

Os Church

Os, NO

The church of Os is a long church dating from 1870. The first mentioned church in Os, probably a stave church, is from the 14th century. This church was replaced by a wooden church built in 1624. As the population of the parish had increased considerably in the 19th century, a new church law was introduced in 1851, which required that each church building should accommodate at least 30% of the parish's inhabitants. As a result, instead of renovating the old church, it was decided to build a completely new church.

Fusa Church

Fusa Church

Bjørnafjorden, NO

Fusa church is a long church from 1962. The church was designed by architect Ole Halvorsen and is the fourth church in the city. The first church - from the Middle Ages - was probably a stave church.

Great Synagogue, Botoşani

Great Synagogue, Botoşani

Botoşani, RO

The Great Synagogue (Hoykhe Shul) was erected in 1834. The synagogue consists of an elongated building decorated with pilasters. Twelve windows, set at the level of the upper floor, illuminate the rectangular main prayer hall. The synagogue includes three spaces with wall and ceiling paintings: the main prayer hall, the women’s gallery, and the heated small prayer hall.

Hålandsdal Church

Hålandsdal Church

Bjørnafjorden, NO

The Hålandsdal church in Bjørnafjorden is a neo-Gothic wooden church built in 1890. The architect of the church is Karl Hansen Askeland.

Eski Mosque

Eski Mosque

Dupnitsa, BG

The mosque welcomed its long-waited renovation in 2018 and had been declared as a monument of local significance.

Yiddishe Shul in Botoşani

Yiddishe Shul in Botoşani

Botoşani, RO

The Yiddishe Shul (Temple at the New Market Place) in Botoşani is an Ashkenazi synagogue that was built in the 20th century. This Neo-Gothic brick building is now abandoned.

Clonmacnoise Monastery

Clonmacnoise Monastery

, IE

The Monastery of Clonmacnoise, also known as the "Seven Churches", was founded around 544 by the one who would later be known as one of the twelve apostles of Ireland, Saint Ciarán. The wealth of the monastery attracted the lust of Irish kings, Anglo-Normans and Vikings who plundered and burned it many times between 841 and 1204. The decline of the road bordering Clonmacnoise in favour of the one passing through Athlone around the 11th century marked the beginning of the decline of the site. In 1552, the English garrison of Athlone sacked the monastery. Three high crosses still stand on the site of the monastery, the "Cross of the North", the "Cross of the South" and the "Cross of the Scriptures", dating from the 9th to the 10th century.

Eidsvoll Church

Eidsvoll Church

Eidsvoll, NO

Eidsvoll church is a cruciform stone church with a tower in the centre of the cross plan. The walls of the choir and the two transepts date from around 1200, while the rest of the building dates from 1885. The church has been destroyed by fire several times, and after the last fire in 1883 the church was rebuilt with major changes under the direction of the architect Carl Konopka. The nave and the upper part of the tower were built in brick instead of stone, and the church was redecorated.

Ål Church

Ål Church

Gran, NO

Ål church, built in 1930, is a large and long church with a solid and high tower in the middle of the nave. The church was built according to the drawings of the architect Magnus Poulsson. It has windows on two floors. The interior has been well preserved and completed since the time of construction.

St. Mary's Church

St. Mary's Church

Gran, NO

The sister churches on Gran were built in the 12th century and expanded in the 13th century. The two stone churches, St. Mary's Church (Mariakirken) and St. Nicholas' Church (Nikolaikirken), are built only 30 meters apart. The churches have been named "Sister Churches" after the legend of two sisters who, due to unfriendliness, had to have their own church. But it was actually not uncommon in the Middle Ages for churches with different functions to be built close together. After a lightning strike in 1813, St. Mary's Church remained a ruin until the 1860s when the church was restored with roofs and windows. In 1912-15 it was again restored to be used as a burial chapel. In 1990-92 it was restored for use as a parish church. The church is built of rough-hewn stone with a chancel that is almost as wide as the nave.

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What is Religiana?

Religiana, a project by Future for Religious Heritage, presents a catalogue of beatiful and inspiring buildings, helping you experience Europe's history, today!