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Maxkirche

Maxkirche

Düsseldorf, DE

The St. Maximilian Catholic Church or Max Church is a late 18th century Baroque church. Former Franciscan monastery, it became a parish church after the abolition of the monastery in 1804.

Medieval Synagogue in Marburg an der Lahn

Medieval Synagogue in Marburg an der Lahn

Marburg an der Lahn, DE

The Medieval Synagogue in Marburg an der Lahn is an Ashkenazi synagogue dating from the 14th century. This Gothic stone building now serves as a museum.

Medieval Synagogue in Miltenberg

Miltenberg, DE

The Medieval Synagogue in Miltenberg was probably built at the end of the 13th century. Definitely put out of use in the mid-19th century, this stone synagogue now serves as a storage.

Medieval Synagogue in Oppenheim

Medieval Synagogue in Oppenheim

Oppenheim, DE

The medieval synagogue (Rathofkapelle) in Oppenheim was used until 1394, when it was sold to Kloster Eberbach. The stone building now serves as a restaurant.

Medieval synagogue

Medieval synagogue

Speyer, DE

The medieval synagogue was dedicated in 1104 and was designed as a Romanesque hall roughly 34 feet wide and 57 feet long. Only the east wall is still remaining and little is known about the interior of the building.

Medieval synagogue, Worms

Medieval synagogue, Worms

Worms, DE

The medieval synagogue in Worms was built in 1034 and is known as the oldest existing synagogue in Germany. The building was rebuilt in 1175 in the Romanesque style. The building was restored again in 1700 and in 1961 using original pieces. The synagogue is now a museum and functioning worship center used by the Jewish community.

Medingen Monastery

Medingen Monastery

Bad Bevensen, DE

The monastery of Medingen was founded in 1241 and moved to Zellensen in 1336. The monastery, originally built in the Gothic brick style, was almost completely destroyed by a devastating fire in January 1781. The monastery was rebuilt between 1781 and 1788 in classicist architecture. The only Gothic brick building that survived from the original monastic complex is the brewery house to the north of the complex.

Meissen Cathedral

Meissen Cathedral

Meißen, DE

Meissen Cathedral is, together with Albrechtsburg Castle, the highest point in the city. The present building was erected from 1250 on the site of a former cathedral dating from the end of the 10th century. Today's cathedral is built according to a Gothic church plan. The choir and cloister were finished in 1268. The stained glass windows of the choir were installed around 1270. The chapel of Sainte-Marie-Madeleine was completed to the east in 1280, the octagonal chapel of Saint-Jean-Baptiste in 1291 and the majestic chapter house in 1297. It was not until 1410 that the nave was completed. The cathedral passed to the Protestant Reformation in 1581.

Merkez Mosque

Merkez Mosque

Duisburg, DE

The DITIB Merkez Mosque, one of the largest in Germany, was built in the traditional Ottoman style between 2004 and 2008. The building has a surface area of 40 by 28 metres, a 34 metre high minaret and a 23 metre high silver dome roof. The gross floor area is approximately 2,500 m². There is no call to prayer by a muezzin outside the building.

Metten Abbey

Metten Abbey

Metten, DE

Metten Abbey is one of the oldest in Bavaria, having been founded in 766. For centuries, under the protection of the Bavarian rulers, the abbey trained renowned philosophers and theologians. In 1803, the abbey was secularised and the monks were expelled. Bought by Johann von Pronath, Lord of Offenberg, he persuaded King Ludwig to open a school in the Benedictine tradition. After years of hardship, Metten was re-established as an abbey in 1840. The abbey library in the east wing is a jewel of Baroque architecture and contains more than 200,000 books and manuscripts. Built between 1720 and 1722, its stuccoes are the work of Franz Josef Holzinger and the murals of Innozenz Anton Warathy.

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What is Religiana?

Religiana, a project by Future for Religious Heritage, presents a catalogue of beatiful and inspiring buildings, helping you experience Europe's history, today!