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Cappella di Santa Crescenzia

Cappella di Santa Crescenzia

San Vito Lo Capo, IT

The chapel of Santa Crescenzia was built in the 13th century in honour of San Vito's nurse, Saint Crescentia. Legend has it that this woman was petrified - transgressing the order not to turn over in a landslide - on the very spot where the chapel was later built. The structure is of the arabesque type, but there are influences from other styles, notably Gothic and Norman.

Santuario di San Vito

Santuario di San Vito

San Vito Lo Capo, IT

The Sanctuary of San Vito began to be built around the 14th century, as a small chapel dedicated to St Vitus the Martyr. The temple was enriched with the proceeds of indulgences granted by Pope Innocent VIII in 1485. In 1526, the entire complex benefited from the munificence of Emperor Charles V of Habsburg. Raised to the rank of sacramental church in 1667 by Monsignor Giuseppe Cigala, Bishop of Mazara, for the assistance of pilgrims in danger of death, it was finally erected as a parish in 1854 by Vincenzo Ciccolo Rinaldi, before the new diocese, in the nascent town of San Vito Lo Capo.

Palmi Cathedral

Palmi Cathedral

Palmi, IT

Palmi Cathedral was first mentioned between 1310 and 1311. The church, destroyed by an earthquake on 5th February 1783, was rebuilt between 1740 and 1743; extensions and modifications were carried out in March 1786. After being rebuilt following an earthquake, St. Nicholas again suffered severe damage in the 1908 earthquake, so that the building was demolished in 1909. The present building was consecrated in 1932.

Tropea sanctuary

Tropea sanctuary

Tropea, IT

The church of Santa Maria dell'Isola was probably founded in the 11th century, on a rock inhabited since the 7th-8th centuries by hermits. After the earthquakes of 1783 and 1905, very little of the original structure was preserved.

Cattolica di Stilo

Cattolica di Stilo

Stilo, IT

The Cattolica is a small Byzantine church built in the 10th and 11th centuries. The name Cattolica was to designate a category of "privileged churches", the term "katholikì" was given only to churches with baptismal fonts. Subjected to the Byzantine Empire until the 11th century, Calabria today preserves many testimonies of oriental art, the Cattolica is a good example.

Church of Piedigrotta

Church of Piedigrotta

Pizzo, IT

The church of Piedigrotta was entirely excavated from the 18th century in a tuff cliff. First a fishermen's chapel, the cave became a church that grew at the turn of the 19th and 20th centuries. Inside there are several groups of sculptures that furnish it, also in volcanic tuff.

Nicastro Cathedral

Nicastro Cathedral

Lamezia Terme, IT

Nicastro Cathedral was built in the Byzantine period in an unknown place. In 1100, Countess Eremburga, niece of Robert Guiscard, built a new cathedral dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, majestic and in Romanesque style. This building collapsed in the earthquake of 1638, and in 1640 Bishop Giovan Tommaso Perrone began building a new cathedral on the present site. At the end of the 19th century, the 17th-century facade completely lost its architectural character, and the facade was modified again in 1925, resuming its current design. In 1935, the maiolica-covered dome was raised and in the middle of the 20th century, the present staircase was built.

Chiesa di Santa Maria della Stella

Chiesa di Santa Maria della Stella

Catanzaro, IT

The church of Santa Maria della Stella was completed with the monastery of Santa Maria della Stella on 4 October 1585. Shortly after the construction of the complex, the small parish that housed it took the name of the Stella district. It was the fourth women's monastery built in Catanzaro.

Chiesa di San Francesco di Paola

Chiesa di San Francesco di Paola

Catanzaro, IT

The church of San Francesco di Paola dates back to the 16th century. The façade dates from the end of the 18th century when it was rebuilt after the damage caused by the earthquake of 1783. The church had previously undergone other restorations, especially after the earthquake of 1638. The facade has two bell towers, among which the decorated gable in neoclassical style stands out, supported by two pilasters of Corinthian order resting on a large base.

Chiesa della Maddalena

Chiesa della Maddalena

Catanzaro, IT

The Church of the Maddalena dates from the 16th century. In 1784, the church and the adjacent convent were closed by royal decree and reopened in 1796, when the parish of San Biagio was moved inside. The building was again closed to worship on 29 November 1810 but reopened after the French decade (1805-1814). The neoclassical facade has pairs of pilasters in Corinthian order, from which a very high entablature rises, ending in a pronounced tympanum.

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What is Religiana?

Religiana, a project by Future for Religious Heritage, presents a catalogue of beatiful and inspiring buildings, helping you experience Europe's history, today!