Church of Saint-Omer

The Saint-Omer church is located in Ochtezeele, in the Hauts-de-France region. The church was built on the foundations of a former 12th century oratory, whose main facade can still be seen on the western side, and is the main witness to the original Romanesque style building. The enlargement of the building took place in the 15th-16th century. Built on a church-hall plan, very popular in the coastal region, the church includes an octagonal bell tower which is one of the highest in Flanders.

About this building

The Church of Saint-Omer is located in Ochtezeele, in the Hauts-de-France region. Ochtezeele is one of the oldest villages in West Flanders. It was first mentioned in an address by Pope Honorius II in 1127. The church was built in the twelfth century, on the foundations of a former oratory, evidence of which can be seen in the western façade, which also the main example the Romanesque style.

The expansion of the building took place between the first third of the 15th century and the second half of the 16th century. Built on a church-hall plan, which is very popular in the coastal region, the church includes an octagonal bell tower which is one of the highest in Flanders. It was at this time also that the northern aisle was widened while keeping the south aisle and adding a triple apse. Only the little door of paradise with its broken arch lintel testifies to the reworking of the facings at the end of the 15th century.

Several objects are classified as Historical Monuments including: an altarpiece of the Virgin and four statues from the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a painting from the eighteenth century depicting St. Nicholas soothing the storm, a tribune organ classified in 1982, the pulpit from the eighteenth century and an eighteenth century choir fence.

Key Features

  • Architecture

Other nearby buildings

Immaculée-Conception de Saint-Omer Church

As early as 1825, the parishioners of Haut-Pont claimed a church to meet the growing influx of faithful. The architect from Lille, Charles Leroy, had his plan imposed and laid the first stone on 4 October 1854 and the church was inaugurated on 8 October 1859, even though it was not completely finished by that date (end of around 1879).

Wikimedia Commons/Velvet

Church of Saint-Denis

The church of Saint-Denis is recognisable by its enormous 13th-century bell tower, the oldest in the North of France. The church was favoured by the Collège de Saint-Omer which was run by English Jesuits. Many English and American Catholic families sent their children there to study, despite Queen Elizabeth I's prohibition. The interiors are particularly rich in examples of numerous artistic movements from the 15th to the 19th century. Its classical barrel-vaulted sanctuary, interiors and furnishings date from an 18th-century reconstruction.