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Wooden articular church of Hronsek

Wooden articular church of Hronsek

Hronsek, SK

The Wooden articular church of Hronsek is a Renaissance church dating from 1726. Its interior is original: the paintings, the bell and the organ all date from the 18th century. Since 2008, the church is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Wooden articular church of Leštiny

Wooden articular church of Leštiny

Leštiny, SK

The wooden joint church of Leštiny is an evangelical joint church built between 1688 and 1689. In this Catholic region, "articular" Protestant churches were then allowed as long as they were made of wood (a material seen as temporary) and did not have a tower or bell. However, a bell tower was erected later in 1777.

Wooden Beit Midrash in Rozalimas

Wooden Beit Midrash in Rozalimas

Rozalimas, LT

The Wooden Beit Midrash in Rozalimas is an Ashkenazi synagogue built in 1880-81 and reconstructed after 1945. After WW II the building served as a storage space; an annex of asbestos sheets was attached to its southwestern side and part of the southwestern wall is bricked over with white silicate bricks. The wooden building is now abandoned.

Wooden Beit Midrash in Veisiejai

Wooden Beit Midrash in Veisiejai

Veisiejai, LT

The Wooden Beit Midrash in Veisiejai is an Askhenazi synagogue built in 1927 by A. Abramas. The wooden building now serves as a church.

Wooden Beit Midrash in Žiežmariai

Wooden Beit Midrash in Žiežmariai

Žiežmariai, LT

The Beit Midrash in Žiežmariai is an Ashkenazi synagogue from the second half of the 19th century. The synagogue was rebuilt after 1918 and after 1945. This wooden synagogue is now under reconstruction.

Wooden Great Beit Midrash in Ivianets

Wooden Great Beit Midrash in Ivianets

Ivianets (Ivenets), BY

The Great Beit Midrash in Ivianets was likely established in 1792. The current wooden building is at least 180 years old. After WWII, the building was reconstructed in order to house a club.

Wooden Mosque

Wooden Mosque

Kruszyniany, PL

The wooden mosque of Kruszyniany was built by tatar settlers of the region around the 18th century. The modern mosque is estimated to have been built in the late 19th or early 20th century. The mosque and the village itself is was designated as a place of national importance for Poland in 2012.

Wooden Synagogue in Alanta

Wooden Synagogue in Alanta

Alanta, LT

The synagogue is a wooden log structure of rectangular plan, built on a rough-stone concrete foundation and divided into two floors in the west. The structure is spanned with a hipped rafter roof covered with tin. On the exterior, the building is protected with horizontal weather-boarding above the windowsills of the prayer hall, and a vertical one below them. A prayer hall of almost square plan is situated on the eastern side. On the western side the building includes a vestibule and a small room with a stove, which also heated the prayer hall. A staircase in the southwestern corner leads to a women's section on the first floor, which opens to the prayer hall with two long rectangular windows. Neither a bimah (presumably at the center), nor a Torah ark (presumably at the eastern wall) has survived. The main entrance to the building is in the western wall and the women's entrance is on the southern wall. Ten round-headed windows opened from the prayer hall: three windows on the southern and northern walls and two pairs of windows on the eastern wall (the central windows on the north and south were later converted into doors). The windows of the vestibule and the women's section are rectangular. The ceilings are joisted flat constructions that of the prayer hall is supported by two large beams, resting on the western wall of the women's section and the eastern wall of the prayer hall.

Wooden Synagogue in Laukuva

Wooden Synagogue in Laukuva

Laukuva, LT

The beit midrash, built in 1928, stands north of Taikos Street, facing the town center with its southern entrance façade. It is a rectangular log structure on a fieldstone masonry foundation, covered with horizontal planks. Oriented with its short walls to east and west, it is 15.13 m long, 13.77 wide and 10.07 m high above the foundation. The building is topped with a gable roof, covered with asbestos sheets; original shingles are partially preserved under them. The prayer hall occupied the eastern part of the building, while the women's section was situated on the first floor of the western part. It may be assumed that the prayer hall was lit by the three windows on south and north; currently, there are only two rectangular windows on each side. The original fenestration on the east is unknown; a doorway in the southern part of the eastern façade is of post-WWII origins. There are no remains of Torah ark or bimah. Two small rectangular windows on the northern façade, and one similar window on each western and southern façades once gave light to the women's section. After WWII, the beit midrash was converted into a palace of culture. The prayer hall was changed into an auditorium, with the stage at the western end, over part of the original vestibule. A wooden entrance portico under a gable roof was added to the southern façade, and a plastered brick cinema projection unit to the eastern one. The building has been abandoned since the 1990s.

Wooden Synagogue in Skhidnytsia

Wooden Synagogue in Skhidnytsia

Skhidnytsia, UA

The Synagogue in Skhidnytsia is an Ashkenazi synagogue completed around 1900. This former wooden synagogue is now a factory.

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What is Religiana?

Religiana, a project by Future for Religious Heritage, presents a catalogue of beatiful and inspiring buildings, helping you experience Europe's history, today!